Tim-Ackland
Dr Tim Ackland

University of Western Australia

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Dr Tim Ackland is Professor of Applied Anatomy and Biomechanics in the School of Human Sciences at The University of Western Australia. Tim is a Fellow of Sports Medicine Australia. He has research interests in the mechanics of human movement with themes spanning exercise rehabilitation, high performance sport and human performance in industry. Professor Ackland has published over 130 peer-reviewed papers as well as 6 academic books and 35 book chapters. He has served as a Director of Sports Medicine Australia and was a member of the IOC Medical Commission’s working party on Body Composition, Health and Performance. Tim also chaired the Scientific Program Committee for the 5th IOC World Congress on Sport Sciences for the 2000 Olympics, and was Conference Co-chair for Sports Medicine Australia in Perth, 2001.

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Associate Professor
Jacqueline Alderson

University of Western Australia

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Jacqueline has always been curious about movement – whether it be helping surgeons make best practice decisions for their patients, helping AFL footballers, elite hockey players and general community athletes avoid anterior cruciate ligament injuries, or advising the International Cricket Council on who might be “chucking” – you’ll find her somewhere close with a camera.

 

An Associate Professor at the University of Western Australia, she holds a BSc with first class honours and PhD in biomechanics who is also an Adjunct Professor in Human Performance, Innovation and Technology at Auckland University of Technology. With 150+ peer reviewed publications she has supervised 22 PhD, 4 Masters and 45 honours by research students to completion and believes that fostering critical and lateral thinking is equally as important as teaching technical skills – especially when preparing students for applied work in the ‘real-world’ settings.

 

She is a former director and fellow of the International Society of Biomechanics in Sport (ISBS) and an executive council member of the International Society of Biomechanics (ISB) with a wide and varied research history in sport and clinical biomechanics. From the role of deep brain stimulation in modulating movement, understanding the loads causing injury in athletes, to creating digital human twins, she now travels the world speaking about her current passions – human engineering, wearable tech, artificial intelligence and its role in tracking, analysing and intervening in the human condition.

Bethanie-Allanson
Mrs Bethanie Allanson

Cricket Australia

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Bethanie has a wide range of sports nutrition experience and has worked with elite athletes for 15 years. She has completed studies in Human Movement and Nutrition and Dietetics, as well as the International Olympic Committee Diploma of Sports Nutrition. She started her sports nutrition career with a Fellowship at the Australian Institute of Sport and gained international experience working for the English Institute of Sport, preparing athletes for major sporting events.

 

Bethanie has worked at the elite level across a number of sports and is currently acting as the Lead Sports Performance Dietitian for Cricket Australia as well as consulting to the Western Australian Cricket Association, Fremantle Football Club (AFL) and the North Queensland Cowboys (NRL).

Tom-Bailey
Dr Tom Bailey

University of Queensland

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Dr Bailey leads the Physiology and Ultrasound Laboratory in Science and Exercise (PULSE) within the School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences at The University of Queensland. His research focuses on understanding changes in cardiovascular control across the female menopausal transition, and investigating the direct effects of exercise on the vascular system, including at the brain. Tom also aims to understand the potential benefits of exercise training on cerebrovascular and cardiovascular health in adults with chronic disease, including adults with vascular disease, mild cognitive impairment, hypertension, and cancers survivors. To do this, he implements a variety of novel ultrasound imaging techniques for the assessment of vascular function and structure, including at the brain, conduit and micro-vessels. Dr Bailey currently reviews for the leading journals in physiology and human movement, including the Journal of Physiology and Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. He serves on national funding panels, including for the National Heart Foundation and the NHMRC.

Jon-Bartlett
Dr Jon Bartlett

Victoria University

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In the last 10 years Jon has amassed a range of experiences through various research and practitioner roles in high performance sport. In the UK, Jon worked with Liverpool FC and the England National Soccer teams whilst simultaneously completing his PhD and post-doc. In 2014 Jon moved to Melbourne and took up a jointly-funded position between Victoria University and Western Bulldogs FC. Jon was Sport Science Research & Service Lead for Player Services and embedded into the day-to-day football operations of the Western Bulldogs FC. In 2016 Jon moved to the Gold Coast SUNS FC as Head of Sport Science & Research with a broad remit of resetting the clubs sport science and nutrition programs, developing partnerships with neighbouring and international universities and embedding a performance-focused research agenda into the club’s football program. Jon has an internationally recognised research track record approaching 50x publications and is often consulted on and asked to speak on areas pertaining to training optimisation, concurrent training, injury and illness, training monitoring, thermoregulation, nutrition and sleep in team sports. Jon currently holds adjunct positions at Victoria University (Research Fellow) and Bond University (Associate Professor) in Australia.

Beck
Professor Belinda Beck

Griffith University

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Belinda Beck is a Professor in the Griffith University School of Allied Health Sciences (Gold Coast, QLD) and the Menzies Health Institute Queensland. She heads the Griffith University Bone Densitometry Research Laboratory and co-founded The Bone Clinic, an innovative translational research facility and clinical practice providing evidence-based exercise for patients with osteoporosis. She graduated from The University of Queensland (BHMS[Ed]) and the University of Oregon (MSc and PhD) and completed a postdoctoral research fellowship in the Stanford University School of Medicine (CA, USA). Her work, primarily related to the effects of mechanical loading on bone, has involved both animal and human models, from basic to clinical research. Her particular focuses have been exercise interventions across the lifespan for the prevention of osteoporotic fracture, and the management of bone stress injuries in athletes and military recruits. Recent projects have included the LIFTMOR and LIFTMOR for Men trials along. She continues to lead a number of other large trials examining the effects of vibration and high intensity resistance and impact training in older adults with low bone mass.

Louise-Burke
Professor Louise Burke OAM

Australian Institute of Sport

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Louise is a sports dietitian with nearly 40 years of experience in the education and counselling of elite athletes. She was Head of Sports Nutrition at the Australian Institute of Sport during its existence from 1990-2018 and continues at the AIS as Chief of Nutrition Strategy. She was the team dietitian for the Australian Olympic Teams for the 1996-2012 Summer Olympic Games. Her publications include over 330 papers in peer-reviewed journals and book chapters, and the authorship or editorship of several textbooks on sports nutrition. She is an editor of the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. Louise was a founding member of the Executive of Sports Dietitians Australia and is a Director of the IOC Diploma in Sports Nutrition. She was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia in 2009 for her contribution to sports nutrition. In 2014 she was appointed as Chair in Sports Nutrition in the Mary MacKillop Institute of Health Research at Australian Catholic University in Melbourne.

Nuala Byrne
Professor Nuala Byrne

University of Tasmania

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Nuala is a Professor in Exercise Physiology and Energy Metabolism, and an Accredited Exercise Physiologist. Nuala is Head of the School of Health Sciences at the University of Tasmania. Her research commonly sits in the nexus between nutritional and exercise physiology. She is internationally recognised for her work to better understand the roles of resting metabolism, diet and physical activity in the aetiology and management of obesity and associated co-morbidities, and in exploring ways to optimise body composition for health and human performance. Nuala has an extensive track record in CAT1 grants, and industry and philanthropic funding. Over many years Nuala has led a team investigating which is more important to achieving effective weight loss – metabolism or behaviour? Another research theme is exploring the relationship between protein metabolism and energy expenditure in optimising lean body mass.
Early in her career, Nuala was awarded the prestigious Young Investigator Award for the Australia and New Zealand Obesity Society (ANZOS). She has held many leadership positions including as Director of the Collaborative Research Network for Advancing Exercise and Sports Science funded by the Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation and Science. Nuala was elected as President of ANZOS, only the second non-medical practitioner to achieve this position. Supporting training in the use of stable isotope technology internationally, Nuala has worked as a technical expert consultant for the IAEA. She is regularly invited to serve as an NHMRC Grant Review Panel member and to the NHMRC Assigners Academy.

John_Cairney
Dr John Cairney

University of Queensland

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Dr. John Cairney is Professor and Head of the School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences at the University of Queensland. He holds adjunct positions as a Professor in the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education at the University of Toronto, and in the department of Family Medicine at McMaster University. John is also Director of the Infant and Child Health Research (INCH) lab, which operates two research facilities at both the UofT and McMaster. He is currently President of the North American Society for Pediatric Exercise Medicine and Past-President of the Canadian Academy of Psychiatric Epidemiology. An internationally recognized leader in the field of child health and physical activity, Dr. Cairney is the author/editor of four books and more than 250 peer-reviewed research articles. He has held numerous funded grants, totaling more than $16.5 million in research grants and contracts as a Principal Investigator. Throughout his career, Dr. Cairney has held several major research positions including a Tier II Canada Research Chair at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health/Uof T, an endowed professorship in child health research and the McMaster Family Medicine Research Chair. A Fellow of the American Psychopathological Association, Dr. Cairney is also the recipient of the Alexander Leighton Award for Lifetime Achievement in Psychiatric Epidemiology. A sought after scientific consultant to government, Dr. Cairney was co-lead on the evaluation of the child and youth mental health strategy in Ontario, a member of scientific advisory board for Healthy Kids Community Challenge, expert advisor on the brain health supplement to the ParticipACTION Report Card (2018), and lead investigator on the special needs strategy in the province of Ontario. In addition to sitting on the editorial boards of several major journals, he is currently the editor-in-chief of the Current Developmental Disorders Reports (published by Springer Press).

JP-Caneiro
Dr JP Caneiro

Curtin University

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Dr JP Caneiro is a Specialist Sports Physiotherapist, Titled Pain Physiotherapist, and has a PhD in Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy. At Curtin University, JP is a research fellow part of a NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Hip and Knee osteoarthritis, and a multicenter trial for back pain. He also lectures in the Master of Clinical Physiotherapy. Clinically, JP focuses on the management of complex musculoskeletal pain presentations, working at Body Logic Physiotherapy in Perth. JP is an Associated Editor for the British Journal of Sports Medicine, and for two educational websites, Body in Mind.org and Pain-Ed.com. JP is also in the scientific committee for the International Association for the Study of Pain. He has published several research papers and presented his work internationally. JP is committed to dispel myths about pain, and to translate scientific evidence into simple and clear messages about pain to the public.

Ross-Clark
Associate Professor
Ross Clark

University of Sunshine Coast

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Associate Professor Ross Clark is a Senior Research Fellow at the University of the Sunshine Coast specialising in creating systems to improve clinical rehabilitation and assessment. His work improving gait, balance and strength has won numerous international awards for innovation, and for his body of research he was the recipient of the 2014 International Society for Posture and Gait Research – Promising Young Scientist award. His systems are used in hospitals worldwide in standard clinical practice and research projects across a range of populations including paediatrics, brain injury, cancer, Parkinson’s disease, tendinopathy and orthopaedic surgery. They have also been used by the major professional sporting codes in Australia, Europe and in the USA. He has 165 peer-reviewed journal publications, including >100 in the last 5 years, and has 2 articles ranked in the top 0.1% for citations in their year of publication. SCIVAL Trends analysis shows that he is the most read author in the world in the journal field “Rehabilitation” over the past 10 years. His personal webpage rehabtools.org, which provides freely available online data analysis programs, downloadable software and system design walkthroughs related to physical function assessment, was accessed >20,000 times in 2019.

Jeff Coombes
Professor Jeff Coombes

University of Queensland

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Jeff is Director of the Centre for Research on Exercise, Physical Activity and Health (CRExPAH) at The University of Queensland. His research interests include optimising exercise for improving health and the mechanisms of exercise-related benefits. Many of his current projects are using high intensity interval training to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and investigate health outcomes. He has over 280 publications, written three text-books, been a chief investigator on over $13million in funding, graduated over 30 PhD students and has a Scopus H Index of 52. He is Chair of the Exercise is Medicine Australia initiative.

Aaron Coutts
Distinguished Professor
Aaron Coutts

University of Technology Sydney, Sport and Exercise Science

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Aaron is a Distinguished Professor and Director of the Human Performance Research Centre at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS). For the past 20 years Aaron’s research has focused around developing evidence-based methods for improving performance and health of athletes. During this period, he has published more than 200 scientific articles. Much of Aaron’s research has been on developing systems to measure, monitor and control the training process in high performance athletes. Further to his academic work, Aaron also provides sport science advice to several leading national and international sporting organisations. He is also an advisor to the Nike Sports Research Laboratory. He has also been the recipient of an Australian Teaching and Learning Citation for outstanding contributions to student learning in sport and exercise sciences. He is currently an Associate Editor for the International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance and Science and Medicine in Football. Aaron is also a practising Accredited Sport Scientist and a Director of Exercise & Sport Science Australia (ESSA).

James-Dimmock
Professor James Dimmock

James Cook University

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James Dimmock (PhD – 2004, UWA) is Professor of Psychology at James Cook University, Queensland. His work is focused on health psychology and health communication, with a particular emphasis on psychological issues associated with participation in exercise and physical activity. Over the last 10 years (2009-2019), James has produced 103 peer-reviewed publications, and his work has been funded by both national (e.g., NHF, ARC) and state-based (e.g., Healthway) funders. In 2019, he became an Innovation Fellow at the University of Western Australia. James has served as an Associate Editor for Psychology of Sport and Exercise and Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, and he currently serves on the editorial boards for International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology and Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology. He co-developed and currently co-chairs the Psychology of Active, Healthy Living group, a cross-institutional and multi-award winning group focused on health psychology.

Jay-Ebert
Dr Jay R. Ebert

HFRC

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Dr Jay R. Ebert has a PhD that was focused in orthopaedic surgery and more specifically cartilage repair, biomechanics and pre- and post-operative rehabilitation, for which he was awarded the Exercise and Sport Science Australia (ESSA) Medal in 2008. He is currently a Lecturer and Researcher at the School of Human Sciences, within the University of Western Australia (UWA). He has a particular focus in orthopaedic surgery and musculoskeletal rehabilitation and, through his clinical and research work at UWA, he has been involved in the project development and coordination of several large orthopaedic research programs. Through this work, he has developed an extensive scientific publication list published in international peer reviewed journals, undertaken in collaboration with orthopaedic surgeons, cell biologists, physical therapists and experimental biomechanists. He is also a Director and practicing Accredited Exercise Physiologist (AEP) at HFRC in Perth, Western Australia, a leading multi-disciplinary rehabilitation clinic with a strong focus on orthopaedic research. He also holds positions as the Director of Research at the Perth Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Research Institute, and is a Director of the Orthopaedic Research Foundation of Western Australia.

Nir-Eynon
Associate Professor
Nir Eynon

Victoria University

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Associate Professor Eynon is an NHMRC Career Development Fellow (2018-2021), a former ARC DECRA Fellow (2014-2016), and a group leader, at the Institute of Health and Sport (iHeS), Victoria University. Nir is also an Associate Editor in BMC Genomics, and PLOS ONE Journals, and an NHMRC Grant Review Panel member. He earned his PhD degree with high distinction in 2010 from Porto University, Portugal.

 

His main area of research is Genetics, Epigenetic and exercise in health and disease, and he is leading the multi-centre Gene SMART (Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Training) study www.vu.edu.au/speed-gene.

 

Nir is currently supervising outstanding post-docs, PhD and honours students (including Dr Sarah Voisin recent recipient of NHMRC ECF (2019-22).

 

Nir have been successful in securing ~$3.3 million in funding (mostly Category-1), and has published 80 peer-reviewed scientific manuscripts in Applied Physiology, Sport Science, Genetics and Clinical journals. He also delivered 35 key-note/invited presentations in international conferences regarding the influence of genetic and molecular factors on exercise.

Finucane
Mr Mark Finucane

West Coast Eagles

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Mark is an Australian Physiotherapy Association Sports and Exercise Physiotherapist with over 20 years working in either professional or Olympic program sports. These include Perth Glory, Australian Men’s Hockey, and currently in his 12th season with the West Coast Eagles Football Club in the AFL, largely the rehabilitation role. After two Eagles players sustained ACL injuries in the early part of 2015, he travelled with them to Philadelphia to spend an intensive week with renowned ACL reconditioning coach Bill Knowles. He returned to Philadelphia in 2017 with another player. An interest in both ACL injury prevention and reconditioning stemmed from these experiences. In addition to his work in the AFL, Mark is part of an ACL reconditioning program that has worked with WAFL players, in addition to state and national level netball and basketball athletes. He is also currently completing, very slowly online, the Masters in High Performance of Sport through ACU.

Olivier-Girard
Dr Olivier Girard

University of Western Australia

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Dr Olivier Girard (https://www.oliviergirard.com/) is an Associate Professor in human performance at the University of Western Australia in Perth (Western Australia) where he also leads an environmental physiology special interest group of 15 academics and 20 students. He spent nearly 20 years in the field of exercise physiology and sport biomechanics on developing and facilitating performance outcome-based solutions for elite athletes, coaches and the rest of their support team. Olivier completed his Doctoral Degree (2006) in Human Movement Sciences at the University of Montpellier in France. For 8 years Olivier worked as Research Scientist at Aspetar – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, a FIFA and IOC accredited medical center. He was also employed as a full-time researcher at Lausanne University (Switzerland) and as a senior lecturer at Murdoch University (Australia). The main focus of his research is to elucidate the mechanisms and adaptations that modulate human performance and health during exercise and physical activity with environmental stress (heat and altitude). Olivier has published over 130 articles in peer-reviewed journals (~5500 citations; H-factor of 40) and 25 book in the field of exercise physiology/sports biomechanics and has presented his work on more than 160 national and international conferences (including over 30 invited/keynote lectures).

Danny-Green
Winthrop Professor
Daniel Green

University of Western Australia

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Danny Green in a human integrative biologist whose research focuses on the prevention of cardiovascular disease. His specific expertise relates to novel imaging approaches to the assessment of micro and macrovascular diseases, including surrogate measures of early and occult disease. He is a cardiovascular exercise physiologist who assesses the impact of exercise, exercise training and physical activity in the context of prevention. This includes the best combinations of exercise, pharmacological and other preventative measures to minimise future development of atherosclerosis in young people at risk and re-occurrence of cardiovascular disease in older individuals. His research encompasses the lifespan; from exercise training and physical activity in the prevention of the development of atherosclerosis in obese children and adolescents, to research on the best combination of exercise and medications in the management of patients with hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, coronary disease and heart failure patients awaiting transplantation.

Simon-Green
Associate Professor
Simon Green

Western Sydney University

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Simon Green completed his schooling and undergraduate studies in Adelaide during the 1970-80s before completing Masters (UVic, Canada) and PhD (UWA) degrees by the mid-90s. He has held academic appointments in Human Movement Studies and Physiology at universities in Ireland, NZ and Australia. He is currently Associate Professor of Sport and Exercise Sciences and conjoint Associate Professor of Medicine at Western Sydney University (WSU).

 

At WSU, Simon teaches undergraduate students (Exercise Physiology) and Master of Research students (Advanced Sports and Exercise Science) and supervises several Masters and PhD students. Within his university he is a senior academic mentor and member of a Professoriate Leadership Group. In 2016 he established a partnership with Bankstown City Aged Care – a not-for-profit and community-based organisation – which has resulted in a Wellness Centre with exercise facility, student placement program, and research program for the elderly.

 

Simon Green’s research has focused on exercise and integrative physiology, with applications to disease and emphasis on development of experimental and analytical techniques. His basic research has focused on muscle metabolism, control of the circulation and heart-lung interactions. In 1999 he was awarded an IOC Prize for Excellence in Biological Sciences Research for his work on interstitial potassium in contracting muscle. His clinical research has focused on exercise limitations in peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes and pulmonary arterial hypertension. His current research is focused on oxygen, heart-lung interactions and the efficacy of oxygen therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension, eccentric exercise in the elderly, and clinical exercise testing.

Kym-Guelfi
Dr Kym Guelfi

University of Western Australia

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Dr Kym Guelfi is a Senior Lecturer in Exercise and Sport Science at The University of Western Australia (School of Human Sciences). She is involved in a number of research projects investigating the role of exercise in disease prevention and management (particularly obesity and diabetes). More specifically, she has a research interest in the benefits of exercise during pregnancy, with a particular focus on the role of exercise to prevent gestational diabetes and other health-related complications.

Cheryce Harrison
Dr Cheryce Harrison

Monash University

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Dr Cheryce Harrison is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow and co-lead of the Healthy Lifestyle Stream at the Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, within the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University. She has a PhD in women’s reproductive health with a background in exercise physiology. Her research interests include lifestyle intervention and weight gain prevention in young, reproductive aged women across preconception, pregnancy and postpartum. With a particular focus on antenatal intervention, she has a broad aim of optimising lifestyle and behaviour as an effective strategy for obesity prevention relevant to all women, across all phases of reproduction, with impact at individual, community and population levels.
Research to date has focused on developing and leading a program of research and translation of healthy lifestyle interventions that are effective, low-intensity, cost effective and reduce complications. With expertise in implementation research, her work has influenced national health practice with translation at scale in both public (Monash Health, Western Health and Royal Hobart Hospital) and private healthcare settings (Medibank Private). International reach includes adaptation in Asia, via the Global Alliance on Chronic Disease and in Europe, via the Impact Diabetes Bump2Baby Consortium. She has experience in Australian Government engagement and policy development, contribution to National evidence-based guidelines, epidemiological research, clinical trial design and management and mechanistic exercise intervention studies.

Hawley John
Professor John A. Hawley

Australian Catholic University, Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research

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John is currently Director of the Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research and Head of the Exercise and Nutrition Research Program at the Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia. He has published over 280 scientific manuscripts, written over 100 articles for technical journals and has authored numerous book chapters for exercise biochemistry and sports medicine texts. He currently sits on the Editorial Boards of many international journals including the American Journal of Physiology (Endocrinology and Metabolism), The Journal of Applied Physiology (U.S.A.), The Journal of Sports Sciences (U.K), Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise (U.S.A.), Sports Medicine (New Zealand) and The International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism (U.S.A.). The focus of his lab’s work includes the interaction of exercise and diet on skeletal muscle metabolism, the molecular bases of exercise training adaptation and the cellular bases underlying exercise-induced improvements in insulin action. He is a frequently invited speaker at both National and International scientific meetings.

Sandi Hayes
Professor Sandra C Hayes

Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University

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Professor Hayes is an Exercise Physiologist, Senior Research Fellow and group lead of the Women’s Wellness Group, within the Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University. Her cancer survivorship research program seeks to improve understanding of the role of physical activity post-cancer and has included the conduct of prospective, longitudinal cohort studies and exercise intervention trials involving more than 8,000 people with cancer. The findings from this work contribute to her broader research goal, which is to improve cancer care through physical activity, including exercise.

Franco_Impellizeri
Professor
Franco Impellizzeri

University of Technology Sydney

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Franco Impellizzeri is a Professor in Sport and Exercise Science and Medicine since 2018 at the faculty of Health of the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) where he teaches applied exercise physiology and research methods. He started his career as a coach before becoming head of research at the MAPEI Sport Research Centre (Italy), where he was taking care of the training and testing for elite and top-professional level athletes. Prof Impellizzeri has also worked 10 years in clinical setting (head of the Lower limb Clinical Outcome Unit) as a Senior Research Fellow at the Department of Research & Development of the Schulthess Clinic (Zurich, Switzerland) developing his research on clinical outcomes and in the area of clinimetrics (patient-reported outcome measures). He is member of the editorial boards of various scientific journals including co-editor in chief of Science and Medicine in Football. His main research areas and interests are training, testing, research methods and more recently injury. He has several publications in the area of sport science and orthopedics. He is fellow of the European College of Sport Sciences and member of the STORK (The Society for Transparency, Openness, and Replication in Kinesiology). He has collaborated with international and national federations and organizations as scientific consultant and as strength and conditioning coach (e.g. for 4 years strength and conditioning coach for the Swiss Fencing National Team for Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games).

Dale Ischia
Mrs Dale Ischia

Moving beyond Cancer

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Dale is an Accredited Exercise physiologist with more than 20 years clinical experience who has specialised in oncology over the past 7 years.

 

She founded ‘Moving Beyond Cancer ‘, an exercise physiology program dedicated to improving the lives of people with a cancer diagnosis through appropriately prescribed exercise.

 

Since acquiring her cancer exercise specialist qualification with the American College of Sports Medicine Dale has provided her expertise to many private clients, organisations and support groups, such as; Olivia Newton John Cancer Centre, The Alfred, Peter MacCallum, The Cancer Council, Think Pink, Pancare, Prostate cancer support groups, and Ovarian Cancer Australia and the Leukaemia Foundation.

 

She applies the latest research findings to her clinical practice to provide her clients with the most up to date education and exercise prescription. Dale’s professional goal is to minimise the side effects of cancer treatment and give people a sense of control over their bodies.

Ben_Jackson Dec19
Associate Professor
Ben Jackson

University of Western Australia

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Ben is an Associate Professor in UWA’s School of Human Sciences—his research, teaching, and community activity is focused in the areas of health psychology, behaviour change, and health promotion. He is a UWA Innovation Fellow and co-directs the award-winning Psychology of Active, Healthy Living (PAHL) Group. The PAHL group oversees a variety of successful community health promotion programs designed to improve the physical and mental health of people from all walks of life. Ben has produced over 120 peer-reviewed publications, has served as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology since 2014, and sits on the editorial boards for Psychology of Sport and Exercise, the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, and Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology. In 2015, Ben received the UWA Vice-Chancellor’s Early Career Investigator Award, and the following year he was named the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity’s (NASPSPA) Early Career Distinguished Scholar. In late 2018, Ben was recognised by the Australian Institute of Policy and Science as the Western Australia Young Tall Poppy of the Year.

Ollie Jay
Associate Professor Ollie Jay

University of Sydney

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Ollie is an Associate Professor in Thermoregulatory Physiology, and Director of the Thermal Ergonomics Laboratory, in the Faculty of Medicine and Health at The University of Sydney, Australia (2014-Present), and Lead Researcher of the Charles Perkins Centre (CPC) Research Node on Climate Adaptation and Health. Originally from the UK, he obtained his PhD in Thermal Physiology from Loughborough University in 2002, which was then followed by 10 years of international research experience at Simon Fraser University (2003-05) and the University of Ottawa (2005-13). His research activities primarily focus on developing a better understanding of the physiological and physical factors that determine human heat strain and the associated risk of heat-related health problems during work and/or sport, as well as among vulnerable people during heat waves.

 

To date, he has a total of 130+ peer-reviewed research publications in international journals (85+ as senior author) including Annals of Internal Medicine and Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). He has received funding from organisations such as National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Wellcome Trust, MS Research Australia, and the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, and has recently led extreme heat policy development for Tennis Australia (including the Australian Open), Cricket Australia, and the National Rugby League (including the 2017 Rugby League World Cup).

 

He is Deputy Editor for Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, as well as an Editorial Board member for Journal of Applied Physiology, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise (MSSE), and Energy & Buildings. In 2017, he was the recipient of a 2-year University of Sydney Research Accelerator (SOAR) Fellowship, and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award For Excellence: Outstanding Research and Teaching.

Dee Jennings
Dr Dee Jennings

Hockey Australia

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Dee has been working in elite sport for over 20 years, with experience across both professional and Olympic organisations. Currently, she is the Manager of Planning and Performance at Hockey Australia, working with the Men’s and Women’s National coaches and Performance providers to ensure the provision of a best practice sports science and medicine program for the Kookaburras and Hockeyroos. Dee received her PhD in Exercise physiology from Victoria University in 2013 and is an Australian Strength and Conditioning Association (ASCA) accredited Level 3 and Master Pro-Structure coach.

 

Previously roles include Performance Manager at Gymnastics Australia supporting the Women’s Artistic program, National Academy Athlete Preparation Manager at Tennis Australia, Physical Preparation Manager at the Victorian Institute of Sport, Strength and Conditioning Manager at Essendon Football Club and Strength and Conditioning coach at the AIS.

Nicole-Korman
Dr Nicky Korman

Metro South Addiction and Mental Health Services, Brisbane

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Nicky Korman is a consultant psychiatrist at the Coorparoo Community Care Unit, a residential rehabilitation unit for people with severe mental illness (SMI), within Metro South Addiction and Mental Health Services, Brisbane. She has worked within rehabilitation services for the past 8 years, in both residential services and early psychosis. Her research interests are in the areas of exercise, nutrition, the metabolic health of people with SMI and their holistic recovery. She has recently implemented an exercise physiology student lead physical activity and nutrition program within 3 residential rehabilitation units following a collaboration with Queensland University of Technology (QUT) exercise physiology department. Dr Korman currently supervises senior exercise physiology students on practicum placement, honours students and also lectures at University of Queensland and QUT in the area of exercise and mental health. Recent publications include High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) for people with SMI and preferences of people with SMI for physical activity measurement. She has received 2 early investigator grants to investigate the use of wearable devices to facilitate physical activity behavior change and is involved in a validation study of the six minute walk test against maximal fitness testing in people with severe mental illness. She coordinates the annual Mind and Body Balance Conference at the Translational Research Institute in Brisbane, hosting international and national experts to disseminate research evidence in the area of nutrition and exercise and mental health to clinical practitioners.

Ashleigh-Lin
Associate Professor
Ashleigh Lin

Telethon Kids Institute

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Associate Professor Ashleigh Lin is a NHMRC Career Development Fellow and Program Head of Mental Health and Youth at the Telethon Kids Institute in Perth. She is also the Co-Director of Embrace at Telethon Kids, Australia’s only research centre for the mental health of children and young people 0-25 years. The focus of Ashleigh’s research is the mental health of young people aged 12-25, with particular interest in the mental health of marginalised groups of young people such as LGBTQIA+ and Aboriginal youth, and young people experiencing homelessness. Her team conduct a range of studies with LGBTQIA+ young people, especially those who are trans and gender diverse.

Andrew-Maiorana-
Associate Professor
Andrew Maiorana

Curtin University

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Associate Professor Andrew Maiorana is a research academic with the School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science at Curtin University and an Exercise Physiologist at Fiona Stanley Hospital in the fields of cardiac rehabilitation and heart failure management. Andrew’s research focuses on optimising exercise testing and training in cardiovascular disease and developing new approaches to clinical practice to improve health outcomes for patients.

 

Andrew helped establish the first comprehensive clinical exercise physiology program in an advanced heart failure and cardiac transplant service in Australia, at Royal Perth Hospital in 1996. The program (now at Fiona Stanley Hospital) continues to provide quaternary heart failure care, including prognostic cardiopulmonary exercise testing and exercise prescription for patients with advanced heart failure, pre and post cardiac transplantation and following left ventricular assist device implantation.

 

Andrew was a founding member of the ESSA Cardiovascular Special Interest Group, has led the Pre-Exercise Screening Working Group and was the cardiovascular content lead on the Exercise Physiology Accreditation Review Committee. He holds a position on the WA Department of Health Executive Advisory Group for the Cardiovascular Health Network and is an active member of the Australian Cardiovascular Health and Rehabilitation Association, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand and the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation.

Alannah_McKay
Ms Alannah McKay

Australian Institute of Sport

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Alannah McKay completed a Bachelor of Science (Exercise, Health and Sports Science) at the University of Western Australia in 2014. Subsequently, Alannah completed a post-graduate position within the Physiology department at the Australian Institute of Sport, where she was involved in the preparation of many Australian athletes prior to the 2016 Rio Olympic and Paralympic games. Since, Alannah has commenced a PhD in partnership with the Australian Institute of Sport, Western Australian Institute of Sport and the University of Western Australia. Her research has investigated how training with altered carbohydrate availability, either acutely or chronically, can impact iron regulation and the immune response to exercise in elite level athletes. Furthermore, Alannah has been involved in projects examining the impact of low carbohydrate high fat diets on a range of health, metabolism and performance parameters, the efficacy of ergogenic aids and strategies to optimise iron stores in athletes.

Clare_Minahan
Associate Professor
Clare Minahan

Griffith University

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Clare Minahan is an Associate Professor at Griffith University, Queensland Australia, and has led the Griffith Sports Science group since 2002. Clare’s interests are in the advancement of human performance via exercise training, as well as dietary and environmental interventions. A key focus of Clare’s research is the unique determinants of performance in the female athlete and their distinct physical, metabolic, hormonal, immunological and cognitive responses to exercise and training. The findings of these investigations and their application allows Clare to appreciate the competing requirements of short-/long-term health and performance optimisation in elite athletes. Clare started her family in 2006, easing to a 0.5FTE academic position until 2019. She has published over 60 peer-reviewed scientific articles (2220 citations) with a h-index of 25 (Google Scholar). Clare is a Level 2 Sports Scientist (Exercise and Sports Science Australia; ESSA) and a Level 2 Strength and Conditioning Coach (Australian Strength and Conditioning Association). She is a member of the ESSA Sports Science Advisory Group and is an Associate Editor for Frontiers in Sports & Active Living for the Elite Sports and Performance Enhancement section. Clare has had the pleasure of being a mentor and advisor to a number of post-doctoral fellows and PhD students, and currently supervisors nine post-graduate students embedded in elite-sport environments (Queensland Academy of Sport, National Rugby League Jillaroos, Swimming Australia, Gold Coast Titans) which provides Clare with an avenue for vigorous academic research and applied sports science exchange.

Brendan_Mouatt
Mr Brendan Mouatt

The Biomechanics Clinical Practice

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Brendan Mouatt is an Accredited Exercise Physiologist and Director at The Biomechanics Clinical Practice in Melbourne. The Biomechanics is a multidisciplinary practice that has set out to develop a business model that is both sustainable and yet prioritises ethical, patient-centred healthcare practices.

 

Brendan is currently involved in a Master of Research at the University of South Australia in the Body in Mind research group. His research has looked at factors that influence the affective and motivational responses to exercise using virtual reality as well as the role visual sensory input plays in the perception of effort and body ownership.

 

Further, Brendan is an educator and director at The Knowledge Exchange, a business providing evidence-based, biopsychosocial continuing education to allied health professionals around musculoskeletal rehabilitation, exercise, and behaviour change. The courses aim to empower clinicians to adopt a contemporary biopsychosocial approach to their clinical practice and help translate current evidence into practice – an endeavour Brendan is highly passionate about.

Robyn_Murphy
Professor Robyn Murphy

La Trobe University

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Robyn obtained her PhD at Deakin University, Melbourne in 2003. Her postdoctoral time was in the Department of Zoology, La Trobe University, as an NHMRC Peter Doherty Early Career Research Fellowship (2006-2009). In 2010, she began her academic career in Zoology and she progressed to Head of Department (2017-2019) in Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe University and full professor in 2018. Robyn served as the National Secretary of the Australian Physiological Society (2010-2013) and served on Council (2009-2017). She currently sits on multiple Executive Committees within her University as well as internationally. Robyn is passionate about mentoring in a variety of capacities. Robyn has published over 90 peer-reviewed research articles. The overall research interest of the Murphy lab is in the area of skeletal muscle in health and disease, from a muscle biochemistry perspective, where they aim to understand proteins important for metabolic and overall muscle health. The laboratory’s particular expertise is in being able to identify proteins in very small sample sizes. This allows the examination of the movement of specific proteins following micro-dissection of fibres, providing quantitative assessment of the redistribution of proteins with given interventions. This research provides mechanistic insight into how changes in protein abundance and/or their movements that occur as a result of exercise, disease and ageing can affect the ability of muscle to produce force and thereby confer strength and stability, as well as maintain metabolic health. Such understandings will contribute to understanding how we can maintain strong muscles for healthy living.

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Dr Louise Naylor

University of Western Australia

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Dr Louise Naylor is a researcher and academic in the University of Western Australia’s School of Human Sciences and also an ESSA Accredited Exercise Physiologist. She believes exercise is medicine and can be used to treat, prevent or reduce the impact of chronic disease. Her research explores how exercise training can contribute to rehabilitating and improving health outcomes in individuals with, or at risk of, cardiovascular disease, survivors of childhood cancer and children with metabolic conditions.

 

After completing her undergraduate degree and PhD at UWA, Dr Naylor commenced her research career working with both elite athletes and chronically ill individuals with conditions such as heart failure and obesity. Her research investigated how exercise can improve health and wellbeing, quality of life, depression and anxiety.

 

In a growing and research-led field, her projects have spanned topics such as understanding how to optimise prescriptions for survivors of cancer, patients with heart failure, ageing men, and patients with diabetes.

 

Her research further investigates the need for exercise programs to be personalised to be effective, and the difference between different individual responses to exercise programs and why some people don’t respond at all.

 

Dr Naylor is also involved in basic science research to add further mechanistic insights into the regulation of the cardiovascular system and generate a multifaceted understanding of cardiac and vascular exercise physiology.

 

As an ESSA Accredited Exercise Physiologist, Dr Naylor works as a Senior Exercise Physiologist in the Cardiac Rehabilitation Service at Fiona Stanley Hospital.

Rob_Newton
Professor Robert Newton

Edith Cowan University

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Professor Robert Newton is Professor of Exercise Medicine at Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia. Current major research directions include: exercise medicine as neoadjuvant, adjuvant and rehabilitative cancer therapy to reduce side-effects and enhance effectiveness of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy; the influence of targeted exercise medicine on tumour biology and exercise medicine for reducing decline in quality of life, strength, body composition and functional ability in cancer patients.

 

Professor Newton has published over 800 scientific papers including 393 refereed scientific journal articles, 450 conference abstracts and papers, three books, 16 book chapters and has a current Scopus h-Index of 75 with his work being cited 19,000 times. As of 2020 Professor Newton has attracted over $40 Million in competitive research funding.

 

In 2018 Professor Newton received the career achievement award from the Cancer Council WA and in 2019, was named the Western Australia Premier’s Scientist of the Year.

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Professor Sophia Nimphius

Edith Cowan University

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Sophia Nimphius, PhD, PCAS-E, CSCS*D, ASpS2, AHPM is a Professor of Human Performance at Edith Cowan University (ECU), leads High Performance Services for Softball Western Australia and is a current Board Member for the Australian Strength and Conditioning Association. She previously served as the Sport Science Manager at the Hurley Surfing Australia High Performance Centre and has been privileged to receive several recognitions for her contribution to the field including the 2017 Female Leader in Exercise & Sports Science by Exercise and Sports Science Australia. She is a passionate advocate for enhancing representation in high performance sport positions.

Ken-Nosaka
Professor Ken Nosaka

Edith Cowan University

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Professor Nosaka is currently the Director of Exercise and Sports Science in the School of Medical and Health Sciences at Edith Cowan University (ECU). He worked in Japan for nearly 20 years before relocating to ECU in April 2004 as an Associate Professor, and became a Full Professor in December 2009. Over the past 16 years, his main responsibilities were to coordinate Postgraduate and Honours research programs (2007-2014), direct the Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research (2007-2012), and lead the Exercise and Sports Science discipline (2015-present). He has supervised 30 PhD and 24 Masters by Research students to completion, and currently supervises 7 PhD and 1 Masters students. He received the Vice Chancellor’s Award “Excellence in Research Supervision” in 2008, and “Excellence in Research” in 2012.

 

Professor Nosaka’s main research topic is “eccentric exercise,” has published more than 270 peer-reviewed papers (his current h-index is 53 in Scopus), and about 80% of them are related to eccentric exercise (e.g. muscle damage and adaptations induced by eccentric exercise, effects of eccentric exercise on health and fitness). His research has been internationally recognised, and he is considered as a world leader in the area of eccentric exercise research. His other research interests include neuromuscular fatigue, strength and power training, exercise as medicine, thermoregulation, and muscle cramp. He has established collaborations with many institutes nationally and internationally, and is actively involved in collaborative research projects. He runs a community program called “Stay Sharp”, in which he instructs eccentric exercises to older adults.

MJ-Ong
Dr MJ Ong

Active Mamas by MJ

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Dr MJ Ong is the founder and head health & fitness coach of the Active Mamas by MJ and Active Mama Tribe, a support & exercise group for mothers looking to create an active, fit and healthy lifestyle for themselves and their families. Through her research in pregnancy and exercise, and personal experiences as a mother of two, she saw that lack of support in the population of mother with kids under the age of 6. Keen to put her research into practice, she created a business of her own, which creates opportunities for mothers to be supported and active. It is her personal belief that if the mother is healthy and active, her children and family will be as well. Dr Ong works very closely with the community she lives in, in Belmont Western Australia. She was awarded the Exercise Scientist of the Year Award for 2019, by Exercise and Sport Science Australia, recognising her work to be highly impactful for the health of Australia. Dr Ong has also authored articles in prominent journals such as Diabetes & metabolism, Obstetrics & Gynecology, and co-authored the guidelines for Exercise in Pregnancy for The Royal Australia & New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists.

Peter OSullivan
Distinguished Professor
Peter O’Sullivan

Curtin University

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Peter is a John Curtin Distinguished Professor at the School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science at Curtin University and a Specialist Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist (as awarded by the Australian College of Physiotherapists in 2005). He is internationally recognised as a leading clinician, researcher and educator in Musculoskeletal pain disorders. With his team he has published more than 260 papers, written numerous book chapters and has been keynote speaker at over 100 national and international conferences. Peter also consults at bodylogic.physio where he reviews disabling musculoskeletal pain disorders.

Periard Julien
Associate Professor
Julien Periard

University of Canberra, Research Institute for Sport & Exercise

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Associate Professor Julien D. Périard

University of Canberra Research Institute for Sport and Exercise (UCRISE)

Dr. Périard is an Associate Professor at the University of Canberra Research Institute for Sport and Exercise (UCRISE). He is also an Adjunct Senior Lecturer at the University of Sydney and former Head of Research Operations for the Athlete Health and Performance Research Centre at Aspetar, Qatar. His scientific expertise lies in the area of environmental physiology (i.e. heat and altitude) where he uses an integrative research approach to examine the physiological mechanisms that mediate health and performance. Over the last decade Dr. Périard has studied the pathways via which fatigue develops during prolonged exercise in the heat, along with strategies to mitigate its influence. He has worked with both amateur and professional athletes from various disciplines, along with National and International Federations (e.g. FIFA, IAAF, ITF, ITU and UCI). He has authored over 65 research publications and book chapters, including a textbook on Heat Stress in Sport and Exercise. He has also presented at more than 60 international conferences.

Ben-Rattray
Associate Professor
Ben Rattray

University of Canberra

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Ben Rattray is an Associate Professor at the University of Canberra (UC) working with the Research Institute for Sport and Exercise (UCRISE). He teaches across several Exercise Physiology related units at both undergraduate and postgraduate level and contributed to the Australian and New Zealand version of the Power and Howley Exercise Physiology textbook in 2014.

 

Ben earned his doctoral degree at the University of Sydney in 2009, focusing on mitochondrial and calcium interactions in skeletal muscle. Since starting at UC in 2009, Ben has shifted his focus towards understanding interactions between human movement and the brain, seeking to optimise health and performance. Ben’s research seeks to understand how exercise can impact cognition and how the brain contributes to fatigue in both acute and chronic settings.

 

His work utilises approaches including perceptual and performance outcomes alongside cerebrovascular physiology, electroencephalography and structural MRI. This work has been applied in a range of contexts including military, occupational, health and high-performance sport settings. In 2016, Ben was awarded UC’s Early Career Research (Science, Health and Technology) prize and has a growing reputation as a leader in the area with collaborations worldwide. Ben now heads the Active Brain research theme within UCRISE.

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Mr Nathan Reeves

Griffith University

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Nathan is a practicing Accredited Exercise Physiologist (AEP) with an interest in the area of workplace injury prevention and management. Over the past 15 years he has consulted to federal and state government agencies and extensively across the private sector in the workplace rehabilitation space. Nathan was a Commonwealth Government agency Workplace Assessment and Return to Work Lead Trainer for 7 years and is currently a senior lecturer at School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University where he convenes two courses dedicated to the professional practice of exercise physiology, including the provision of workplace rehabilitation service under various state and commonwealth regulations. Nathan holds a SIRA Exercise Physiologist Provider Number and SIRA Workplace Assessment Provider Number. Nathan is the occupational rehabilitation section editor for the Journal of Clinical Exercise Physiology.

 

Nathan is currently the Chair of an international alliance for the practice of exercise and sport sciences, and ESSA’s Professional Standards Advisory Council. He was a Director on the Exercise & Sports Science Australia (ESSA) national board from 2010-17, and ESSA President/Chair, Chair of the Governance and Nominations Committee and committee member on the Audit Finance and Risk Committee from 2014-17. Nathan previously sat on the ESSA Queensland State Chapter Committee as committee member and chair over a period of four years.

 

Nathan is a graduate of the AICD Company Director and Mastering the Board courses.

Sam Robertson
Professor Sam Robertson

Victoria University

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Sam Robertson is a Professor of Sports Analytics at Victoria University. He is responsible for driving research and commercial activity within sport at Victoria University, as well as managing its many sports industry partnerships, including Tennis Australia, the Western Bulldogs, FIFA, the AFL & Champion Data, and San Antonio Spurs. Sam also consults on innovation and improving operational decision-making to professional sports clubs globally and is involved in the sports technology start up scene. His research predominantly focuses on the application of analytics for improving decision-making of both athletes and sports organisations and he has published over 100 peer-reviewed papers.

Simon_Rosenbaum
Associate Professor
Simon Rosenbaum

University of New South Wales & Black Dog Institute

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A/Prof Simon Rosenbaum is a Scientia Fellow in the School of Psychiatry, UNSW Sydney and the Black Dog Institute. Simon’s research looks at the impact of physical activity on symptoms of mental disorders and the implementation of exercise as a component of care within mental health and humanitarian settings. Simon serves as an elected national director of Exercise & Sports Science Australia (ESSA) and is the Vice President of the Australasian Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. Simon is currently on secondment with the United Nations in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh building capacity among frontline mental health staff working in the world’s biggest refugee camp.

Michael Rosenberg
Associate Professor
Michael Rosenberg

University of Western Australia

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Michael has 20 years’ experience in community-based health and exercise research. Michael has a broad range of research interests focused around (1) Public health epidemiology and health promotion. (2) Health program evaluation, (3) children’s physical activity measurement and improvement and; (4) the use of integrative technologies to measure and improve human health.

 

Michael has led research measuring the prevalence of health behaviours at state and national level amongst children and adults. He was the lead evaluator of state wide physical activity, healthy weight, youth tobacco control, and workplace health community-wide campaigns. Recently, he was a co-author on the Thailand children’s physical activity report card.

 

A key program goal of Michael’s is “to have every child ready to move by the time they start primary school and moving regularly and proficiently by the time they leave.” In this area, Michael has led research into the development of fundamental movement skill measurement and school-based interventions. More recently, Michael has investigated the use of technologies to improve the measurement and movement skill development of children, including the objective assessment of fundamental movement skills using Microsoft Kinect sensors.

 

Michael also has research grants investigating the use of assisted technologies in the measurement of physical activity indoors, using RFID technologies and the use of music entrainment through wireless mobile sensors and phone applications to improve functional movements as part of rehabilitation programs. New technologies are also being built to assess and improve gait amongst stroke, Parkinson and cerebral palsy patients.

Mia-Schaumberg
Dr Mia Schaumberg

University of the Sunshine Coast

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Dr Mia Schaumberg is a Senior Lecturer in Physiology and Bachelor of Biomedical Science Program Lead within the School of Health and Sport Sciences at the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC). Her PhD research (UQ) investigated the exercise and training implications of oral contraceptive use and female hormone status. Her interests in endocrine function and exercise led to her postdoctoral research in understanding hormone mechanisms of improving brain health and preventing cognitive decline through exercise.

 

In collaboration with the Queensland Brain Institute, Mia established the UQ Centre for Exercise and Healthy Brain Ageing, which facilitates ongoing research into the effect of exercise on brain health in older adults. By combining measures of physiological and functional fitness, cognitive function, blood biochemistry, epigenetics, and brain imaging, she investigates exercise related changes that are invaluable in guiding understanding of how to slow, prevent, or even reverse cognitive disease progression in older adults.

 

Her research extends into the community, with partnerships with local organisations, council, and retirement villages. The quality and significance of her research has resulted in $5.5 million of funding as CI from government and philanthropic sources and is attracting a growing body of research students and collaborators. She contributes in leadership positions within the NHMRC National Institute for Dementia Research (dementia prevention) and is an Associate Editor for Applied Physiology, Metabolism and Nutrition. Her research has resulted in multiple media invitations, most notably for ‘Catalyst’, ABC612 radio and the international Podcast ‘2Scientists’.

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Dr Brendan Scott

Murdoch University

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Brendan received his PhD from the University of Newcastle in 2016, which investigated the effects of hypoxia on responses to resistance exercise. He has published >40 scientific articles, focused on exercise with systemic hypoxia (altitude) and localised hypoxia (blood flow restriction), as well as optimising methods to monitor athletic training. Brendan has consulted as a sports scientist with elite athletes and officials from a range of sports (including rugby league, Australian rules football, soccer, elite powerlifting), and his work has been used to develop best-practice guidelines for blood flow restriction exercise in elite sporting environments. Brendan is currently a Senior Lecturer (Strength and Conditioning) at Murdoch University, and holds accreditation as a Level 2 Sports Scientist with ESSA, and Level 2 Strength and Conditioning Coach with the ASCA.

Shaw Chris
Dr Chris Shaw

Deakin University

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Chris Shaw is a Senior lecturer in Exercise Physiology within the Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition at Deakin University, Australia. Dr Shaw received his PhD in Exercise Metabolism from the University of Birmingham, UK, before completing post-doctoral fellowships in Birmingham and then Victoria University.

 

Dr Shaw’s research focuses on the metabolic adaptations to skeletal muscle in response to various exercise interventions, and how these adaptations contribute to reducing metabolic disease risk in active and sedentary populations. His work uses a combination of approaches including invasive studies in humans and animal models of metabolic disease to explore the interaction between lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. He has specific interest and expertise in applying imaging techniques to human muscle biopsies and in exploring muscle fibre type specific differences in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. He is currently a council member of the Australian Physiological Society and a reviewing panel member of the European College of Sports Science.

Camille-Short
Dr Camille Short

University of Melbourne

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Dr Camille Short is a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne with experience and training in health psychology, exercise medicine, and public health. She is an advocate for interdisciplinary approaches to exercise promotion, acknowledged by her joint appointment between the Melbourne Centre for Behaviour Change in the School of Psychological Sciences and the Department of Physiotherapy in the Melbourne School of Health Sciences. She holds a PhD in Behavioural Medicine, and is widely recognised for her intervention research on exercise and cancer control across primary and tertiary prevention settings. Her main research interest is the use of technology for improving access to high quality, personalised, and multidisciplinary exercise support. She has published 70 peer reviewed publications and is now working closely with consumers and clinicians to translate her research findings into practice.

Tina_Skinner_LR
Dr Tina Skinner

University of Queensland

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Dr Tina Skinner is a Senior Lecturer within the School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences at The University of Queensland (UQ). Tina’s research focuses on reducing cancer progression and improving disease- and treatment-related symptoms of people with cancer using exercise and nutrition. She is a main driver of exercise oncology research at UQ, leading collaborations with high profile researchers across Australia, Sweden and Canada. The quality and significance of this research has resulted in several funded projects from the NHMRC, Medical Research Future Fund and the Movember Foundation. She has 35 successful grants totalling $4 million of project funding, with over 60% as lead investigator.

 

Together with Professor Jeff Coombes, she is the editor of ESSA’s Student Manual for Health, Exercise and Sport Assessment. Tina has 60 publications, with over two thirds of her articles published in top quartile of journals by impact factor.

 

She has a strong record of research higher degree (RHD) student supervision. Tina is currently supervising 10 RHD students (7 as primary/co-primary supervisor) and has successfully advised 11 RHD students (6 as primary/co-principal supervisor) to completion. Her RHD graduates have each had successful outcomes across employment, publications, funding and awards.

 

Tina enjoys translating and disseminating her work to AEPs and other health professionals, researchers, people with cancer and the wider community. She has received over 50 media requests for comments and articles about her research, including from The Australian and an article in the New York Times.

Gary-Slater
Associate Professor
Gary Slater

University of Sunshine Coast

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Gary is an advanced accredited sports dietitian who has been working in elite sport since 1996. Gary currently splits his time between his role as National Performance Nutrition Network Lead within Performance Networks and Partnerships of the Australian Institute of Sport and coordinating a Master’s Degree in Sports Nutrition at the University of the Sunshine Coast. He has consulted to a number of professional teams and wide array of individual elite & recreational athletes in supporting their sporting ambitions. Gary’s professional interests relate primarily to enhancing sports performance. Gary is particularly passionate about factors influencing muscle protein metabolism and muscle hypertrophy/atrophy, nutritional ergogenic aids, nutrients timing and the influence of body composition on sports performance. His publications include over 100 manuscripts in peer reviewed journals and book chapters. Gary will be supporting the Australian Olympic and Paralympic teams throughout Tokyo 2020.

Neil-Smart
Professor Neil A. Smart

University of New England

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Neil has been an exercise physiologist for more than 25 years and has practised in primary and tertiary care centres in the UK, SE Asia and Australia. In his early career Neil gained invaluable experience in exercise testing and prescription, for cardiac patients. Neil has since become an internationally recognised leader in exercise epidemiology and healthy aging, publishing more than 130 peer-reviewed journal manuscripts. Neil’s career research ‘theme’ has been to understand the optimal exercise program prescription for a range of chronic illnesses commonly encountered by accredited exercise physiologists in clinical practice. Neil has systematically synthesized the published literature, with periodic updates, to evaluate the evidence for optimizing exercise prescriptions for a range of chronic diseases, most notably heart and renal failure, diabetes and related metabolic derangements.

 

Neil has clinical trial experience and expertise conducting meta-analyses of lifestyle and pharmacological treatments for managing chronic illnesses. Neil has recently focussed on the benefits of isometric exercise to manage hypertension. In 2017 the American Heart Association’s guideline paper on hypertension, recognized isometric exercise as a vital treatment strategy, this announcement was in part due to Neil’s contributions to this field.

 

Since 2001 Neil has been accredited by ESSA (Exercise & Sport Science Australia), as an exercise physiologist. In recognition of his work as Chair of ESSA’s Cardiovascular Special Interest Group and Research Committees, as well as contributions to the National University Accredited Degree Program curricula, Neil was awarded an ESSA Fellowship in 2016. Neil remains chair of ESSA’s national research publications committee.

Jamie-Stanley
Dr Jamie Stanley

South Australian Sports Institute

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Dr Jamie Stanley is a sports physiologist specialising in performance and recovery optimisation working with current world recording holding, Olympic, Commonwealth, and World champion athletes of the Australian Cycling Team track program, and South Australian Sports Institute swimming program. Jamie also holds an adjunct research position at the University of South Australia, is a member of the Australian Institute of Sport Tokyo Heat Project, and is a contributor for The Science and Application of High-Intensity Interval Training textbook and online course (www.hiitscience.com). He has a special interest in integrating environmental stress into training to enhance adaptations. Formerly Jamie competed at an elite level in triathlon, but is now chasing a sub 2 hour 30 minute marathon.

Larissa_Trease
Dr Larissa Trease

ASADA

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Dr Larissa Trease is an Australian Sport and Exercise Physician who has worked extensively in elite sport, including as an Australian Team Doctor for both Summer (Rio 2016) and Winter (Sochi 2014) Olympic Games. She has been the Principal Medical Officer for Rowing Australia (2012-16) and the Chief Medical Officer for the Australian Paralympic Team (Beijing 2008) and the Australian Winter Youth Olympic Games Team (Innsbruck 2012.)

 

Lari has been a member of ASDMAC (Medical advisory committee to ASADA) since 2016 and currently works with the Australian Sports Anti-doping Agency (ASADA) providing in-house medical advice on anti-doping matters. She is passionate about educating practitioners and athletes on how to assess and reduce the risk of anti-doping rule violations.

Grant Turner
Mr Grant Turner

Robina Health Precinct

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Grant has worked for QLD health for the last fifteen years, two years as a cardiac scientist and thirteen years as an Accredited Exercise Physiologist within the Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service, Chronic Disease and Post Acute program. He has wide expertise within chronic disease management including heart failure rehab, pulmonary rehab, cardiac rehab, vascular rehab, diabetes and multiple sclerosis. He has publications within the fields of multiple sclerosis, community based program exercise intensity grading and diabetes. He Lectures at Griffith university on the topics of cardiac rehab, vascular rehab, diabetes and Multiple sclerosis. He is past Qld Health Exercise physiology Advisory group chair and current National Exercise Physiology Advisory Group chair. I welcome Grant to present his 2019 publication ‘Resources to Guide Exercise Specialists Managing Adults with Diabetes’ which exemplifies our conference theme of translating research evidence into day to day practice.

Willis
Dr Claire Willis

La Trobe University

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Dr Claire Willis is a postdoctoral research fellow and senior exercise physiologist at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia. Her research is focused on developing and evaluating exercise and physical activity interventions for children with disabilities and complex medical conditions. She previously coordinated the Exercise and Health Promotion Service in the Department of Paediatric Rehabilitation at Perth Children’s Hospital, and has worked extensively in paediatric hospitals and community-based rehabilitation programs around the world. Dr Willis has been involved in the development of health assessment tools and rehabilitation programs for children with disabilities in low- and middle-income countries, consulting for UNICEF to guide research in these settings. She is a sessional lecturer in paediatric exercise physiology, a research supervisor for exercise physiology, physiotherapy and occupational therapy students, and is a passionate advocate for consumer and community involvement in research. Dr Willis is currently managing a multi-site clinical trial funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council, investigating the feasibility and health economics of community-based exercise programs for young people with a disability.